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OP 005
DEVELOPMENT OF A JOINT INJECTION/ASPIRATION SIMULATION COURSE FOR SPECIALITY TRAINEES IN RHEUMATOLOGY
  1. Rasha Omer1,
  2. Anetha Sabanathan2,
  3. Lisa Dunkley3,
  4. Makani Purva4
  1. 1Leadership and Simulation Fellow, Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust
  2. 2Leadership and Simulation Fellow, Hull Royal Infirmary, Hull and East Yorkshire NHS Trust
  3. 3Consultant Rheumatologist, Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust
  4. 4Consultant Anaethetist, Hull Royal Infirmary, Hull and East Yorkshire NHS Trust

Abstract

Background The JRCPTB* Training curriculum for Rheumatology mandates that trainees should be able to:

1. Describe the surface anatomy of the musculoskeletal system

2. Gain competences in joint and soft tissue injections.

This is usually achieved in an informal basis. Simulation can provide a realistic learning opportunity to develop this skill. We designed and ran a simulation course to aid trainees in achieving these competencies.

Methodology 10 junior rheumatology trainees were invited to participate. The course started with a lecture which covered indications and contraindications to procedures including a summary of results from a regional survey of Rheumatology consultants and registrars on joint injection techniques. Faculty consisted of 4 Rheumatology Consultants and 3 Senior Registrars. At least one faculty member per station was present to provide instructions. Actors were used to demonstrate knee, shoulder and ankle/foot surface anatomy. Instructors demonstrated elbow, hand and wrist anatomy on themselves. Self-reported level of confidence using Likert score Pre and Post workshop questionnaires were used for evaluation.

Results 9/10 of the trainees felt that the session met their learning objectives. Confidence levels increased non-significantly in performing wrist, carpel tunnel, glenohumeral, subacromial and knee injection. Confidence levels increased significantly in performing ankle, acromoclavicular, elbow and epicondyle injections.

Conclusions It is possible to successfully run a simulated joint injection course which can improve confidence levels in trainees.

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