Article Text

PDF
0102 Does in-situ simulation have an impact on patient safety and organisational culture?
  1. Robert McGuinness
  1. North Bristol NHS Trust, Bristol, UK

Abstract

Background/context Adverse events affect 11.7% of all NHS patients.1 The cause for 70% of these are failures in human factors.2 Trusts are looking to simulation for ways to improve patient safety, improve organisational culture and improve the quality of the services they provide.

Methodology (planned) We plan to use low-fidelity, high frequency in-situ simulation with the whole multiprofessional team. The participant’s knowledge of how human factors can affect healthcare should increase and in turn lead to improvements in patient safety.

Data collected from participants using the Mayo High Performance Teamwork Scale (MHPTS) will be analysed over serial simulations to identify improvements in team performance.

Organisational culture will be measured at 6 monthly intervals using the IHI hospital survey on patient safety.

We will also collect organisational performance data to look for themes to reflect our hypothesis, such as, incident reporting, patient complaints data, saving lives data and staff sickness and retention rates.

Results/outcomes (anticipated) We hope to show over the course of the project that team performance will improve to be consistent, when measured by the MHPTS.

We also hope that a greater awareness of human factors will be evident in an increase of our hospitals overall patient safety grade using the IHI patient safety questionnaire six monthly.

We would also expect to see an improvement in our organisational performance data with an initial increase in incident reporting, increased compliance with the saving lives recommendations and reduction in complaints, staff sickness and turnover rates.

Potential impact Highlighting that high frequency simulation sustains improved performance over ‘one-off’ sessions. It will also advocate the use of low fidelity, multiprofessional simulation without needing the resources of a costly simulation centre.

References

  1. De Vries EN, Ramrattan MA, Smorenburg SM, Gouma DJ. Boermeester MA. The incidence and nature of in-hospital adverse events: a systemic review. Qual Saf Health Care 2008;17(3):216–223

  2. Department of Health (DoH) An organization with a memory. London: The Stationary Office, 2000

Statistics from Altmetric.com

Request permissions

If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.