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Simulation in the medical undergraduate curriculum to promote interprofessional collaboration for acute care: a systematic review
  1. Tzu-Chieh Yu1,
  2. Craig S Webster1,
  3. Jennifer M Weller1,2
  1. 1Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, Centre for Medical and Health Sciences Education, School of Medicine, The University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand
  2. 2Department of Anaesthesia, Auckland City Hospital, Auckland, New Zealand
  1. Correspondence to Dr Tzu-Chieh Yu, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, Centre for Medical and Health Sciences Education, School of Medicine, The University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland 1142, New Zealand; wendy.yu{at}auckland.ac.nz

Abstract

This literature review summarises interprofessional, simulation-based interventions in the context of preparing undergraduate and prelicensure healthcare students for the management of acutely unstable patients. There was a particular focus on the impact of such interventions on medical students. The review sought to identify the range of described interprofessional education (IPE) learning outcomes, types of learners, methods used to evaluate intervention effectiveness and study conclusions. We systematically compiled this information and generated review findings through narrative summary. A total of 18 articles fulfilled the review criteria. The diversity of IPE interventions described suggests a developing field where the opportunities provided by simulation are still being explored. With significant heterogeneity among the studies, comparison between them was unfeasible, but each study provided a unique narrative on the complex interplay between intervention, curriculum, learning activities, learners and facilitators. Together, the narratives provided in these studies reflect positively on undergraduate simulation-based interventions to promote interprofessional collaboration in acute care settings, and provide the basis for recommendations for future IPE design and delivery, and areas requiring further research.

  • interprofessional education
  • simulation-based training
  • acute care
  • undergraduate

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