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Combining medical, physiotherapy and nursing undergraduates in high-fidelity simulation: determining students’ perceptions
  1. Josephine Seale,
  2. Sabina Ikram,
  3. Lewis Whittingham,
  4. Colin Butchers
  1. GKT School of Medical Education, Chantler SaIL (Simulation and Interactive Learning) Centre, King’s College London, London, UK
  1. Correspondence to Dr Josephine Seale, GKT School of Medical Education, Simulation and Interactive Learning Centre (SaIL), King’s College London, London WC2R 2LS, UK; josephine.seale{at}kcl.ac.uk

Abstract

High-fidelity simulation (Hi-Fi SIM) is increasingly used to provide undergraduate interprofessional education (IPE). Although research has reported positive student feedback, studies have predominantly involved medical and nursing specialties. The present study sought to further explore this area by determining the perceptions of medical, physiotherapy and nursing students participating in the same simulation session. A total of 145 medical, physiotherapy and nursing undergraduate students jointly participated in a novel Hi-Fi SIM IPE programme. Immediately before and after their session, students completed the KidSIM ATTITUDES questionnaire where statements were rated regarding simulation, IPE and human factors. A high score indicated a more positive attitude. Physiotherapy students reported the lowest level of previous Hi-Fi SIM experience. Students from each specialty had more positive attitudes related to simulation, IPE and human factors following their simulation. Physiotherapy students had predominantly less positive attitudes compared with nursing and medical students. Participation in an IPE Hi-Fi SIM session positively impacted on the perceptions of medical, physiotherapy and nursing students regarding the relevance of simulation, IPE and the importance of human factors. Such findings support the use of this learning modality for the provision of IPE in a range of specialties.

  • high-fidelity simulation
  • undergraduate
  • medicine
  • physiotherapy
  • nursing

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Footnotes

  • Contributors JS, SI and LW conceived this study. JS was involved in gaining ethical consent, facilitating simulation sessions, data collection, analysis and preparation of the manuscript for publication. SI was involved in gaining ethical consent, facilitating simulation sessions, organising and carrying out data collection, analysis and reviewing the final manuscript. LW was involved in facilitating simulation sessions, data collection, analysis and reviewing the final manuscript. CB is head of the King’s College London school of medical education’s clinical skills team and was involved in facilitation of the simulation sessions and reviewing the final manuscript.

  • Funding None.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Ethics approval This study was approved by the King’s College Research Ethics Committee (Number: LRS-16/17-3917).

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

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