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Origami debriefing model: unfolding the learning moments in simulation
  1. Clare Butler1,
  2. Rozz McDonald2,
  3. Clair Merriman3
  1. 1 Department of Nursing, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Oxford Brookes University, Oxford, Oxfordshire, UK
  2. 2 Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Oxford Brookes University, Oxford, Oxfordshire, UK
  3. 3 Department of Applied Health and Professional Development, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Oxford Brookes University, Oxford, Oxfordshire, UK
  1. Correspondence to Mrs Clare Butler, Department of Nursing, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Oxford Brookes University, Oxford, Oxfordshire, UK; c.butler{at}brookes.ac.uk

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Debriefing in simulation-based education

There is no standard approach to debriefing; however, the purpose in each is the same—to engage learners in a discussion of guided reflection. Debriefing methods adopting a three-phase conversational structure—reaction, analysis and summary with a ‘good-judgement’ advocacy and enquiry approach—are popular in healthcare simulation.1 2 This active dissection of the situation and reflection of events is thought to be fundamental in developing learners’ understanding and transfer of knowledge. The planned debrief is facilitator guided and usually considered the final stage in simulation, completed at the end of the scenario.

Benefits of in-simulation debriefing

A ‘teachable moment’ has been referred to as being made of perfect timing for knowledge and ability to influence development.3 It could, therefore, be argued that the traditional method of debriefing in the final stage does not provide the flexibility to allow for learning to occur immediately when the teachable moment has occurred.

Throughout the course of our work, we have developed an alternative to debriefing in the final stage. We have recognised teachable moments, or learning moments which are points in a simulated scenario that the learning outcomes and the actions …

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Footnotes

  • Contributors CB contributed to the concept, design, critical revision and final approval of this paper. RM contributed equally to the concept, design, critical revision and final approval of this paper. CM contributed to the concept, critical revision and final approval of this paper.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; internally peer reviewed.

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