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Exposing medical students to various difficulty levels of simulated endotracheal intubations improves success rate: a randomised non-blinded trial
  1. Roy Kazan1,2,3,
  2. Marilù Giacalone4,
  3. Jiaru Liu5,
  4. Etrusca Brogi4,
  5. Shantale Cyr1,2,
  6. Thomas M Hemmerling1,2,6
  1. 1 Division of Experimental Surgery, Department of Surgery, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
  2. 2 Steinberg Centre for Simulation and Interactive Learning, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
  3. 3 Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Surgery, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
  4. 4 Department of Anesthesia, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy
  5. 5 Faculty of Medicine, McGill University, Montréal, Quebec, Canada
  6. 6 Department of Anesthesia, McGill University, Montréal, Quebec, Canada
  1. Correspondence to Dr. Roy Kazan, Division of Experimental Surgery, Department of Surgery, McGill University, Montreal, QC H3G 1A4, Canada; roy.kazan{at}mail.mcgill.ca

Abstract

Objective Simulation training of endotracheal intubation (ETI) has proven to be an effective training tool. We used an adjustable airway mannequin that allows the achievement of various difficulty levels of laryngoscopy to train inexperienced medical students. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of training using this novel airway mannequin on ETI success rates of medical students.

Methods This was a randomised non-blinded trial conducted at the Steinberg Centre for Simulation and Interactive Learning. Twenty recruited medical students were randomly allocated to two different training groups. During training, the mixed training group was asked to perform successful intubations in three levels of difficulty; the standard training group was asked to perform the same number of successful intubations in one level of difficulty. After training, all participants were asked to perform intubations using both the adjustable airway mannequin and a standard mannequin. Success rates and airway surface area visualised were compared between the two groups.

Results Students in the mixed training group had a significantly higher success rate both in the adjustable airway mannequin (p=0.01) and in the standard mannequin (p=0.02). Students in the mixed group had 51%, 59% and 47% significantly more visual area surface than students in the standard group during standard and difficult setup of the adjustable airway mannequin and the standard airway mannequin, respectively.

Conclusions The use of an adjustable airway mannequin to train medical students leads to superior ETI success rates and better glottis visualisation.

  • endotracheal intubation
  • laryngoscopy
  • mannequin
  • simulation
  • success rate
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Footnotes

  • Contributors RK and TMH: study design, execution of study, data collection, data analysis, manuscript transcription and review. MG, EB and SC: execution of study, data collection, data analysis, manuscript transcription and review. JL: data collection, data analysis, manuscript transcription and review. All authors read and approved the final manuscript.

  • Funding The authors have not declared a specific grant for this research from any funding agency in the public, commercial or not-for-profit sectors.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Ethics approval This study received approval from IRB of McGill (Institutional Review Board).

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

  • Data sharing statement The datasets used and/or analyzed during the current study are available from the corresponding author on reasonable request.

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