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Simulation-based education programme for upskilling non-critical care nurses for COVID-19 deployment
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  1. Emad Almomani1,
  2. Jacqueline Sullivan2,
  3. Majed Hajjieh2,
  4. Kim Leighton3
  1. 1 Education and Research Department, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar
  2. 2 Corporate Nursing, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar
  3. 3 Medical Education, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar
  1. Correspondence to Emad Almomani, Critical Care and Trauma Simulation Educator, Hamad Medical Corporation (HMC), Doha, Qatar; Ealmomani{at}hamad.qa; ealmomani101{at}gmail.com

Abstract

Background The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) crisis created pressure on healthcare institutions to be prepared with maximum workforce and bed capacity. Clinical education during COVID-19 has high risk of disease transmission to learners due to contamination of equipment, supplies and surfaces, in addition to increased clinical-related stress and fear. Simulation-based education (SBE) has potential to help manage the pandemic by rapidly upskilling nurses’ clinical responsibilities.

Methods Upskilling of 445 non-critical care nurses was conducted using SBE between 14th March and 30 May 2020. Training consisted of completing a mandatory online critical care awareness module, followed by 3 hours of critical care simulation-based scenarios using demonstration and return-demonstration approach.

Results All 445 non-critical care nurses completed required modules and simulation experiences. The critical care simulation-based upskilling programme was evaluated as an effective way to learn how to manage critically ill patients. The majority of evaluation items were rated over 95% for effectiveness of the education; four items were less than 95% (88–94%). Lower rated items considered training and practice time, improved competency and commitment to apply learning.

Conclusion Rapidly developed and implemented upskilling of critical care nurses was effectively accomplished with SBE. However, learners noted the need for longer learning times and increased practice opportunity to improve competency. Lack of intent to apply the patient care techniques requires further study. SBE has potential as an effective educational method for rapid preparedness in future crisis.

  • Acute Care
  • Critical Care
  • Education
  • Curriculum
  • High Fidelity Simulation
  • Mannequin-Based Simulation

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Footnotes

  • Contributors All persons who meet authorship criteria are listed as authors, and all authors certify that they have participated sufficiently in the work to take public responsibility for the content. The specific contributions made by each author are as follows:

    Conception and design of the study: KL, JS; revising the manuscript critically for important intellectual content: KL, MH; acquisition of data: EA; analysis and/or interpretation of data: EA, KL; drafting the manuscript: EA, MH; approval of the version of manuscript to be published: KL, MH, JS.

  • Funding The authors have not declared a specific grant for this research from any funding agency in the public, commercial or not-for-profit sectors.

  • Competing interests No competing or conflict of interest. All authors declare all relevant competing interests in the competing interests field on ScholarOne.

  • Ethics approval The reporting of this data has been accepted as a Quality Improvement project by the Nursing Continuing Professional Development Committee of Hamad Medical Corporation and therefore is exempt from IRB approval.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

  • Data availability statement Data are available upon request. This article is made freely available for use in accordance with BMJ’s website terms and conditions for the duration of the COVID-19 pandemic or until otherwise determined by BMJ. You may use, download and print the article for any lawful, non-commercial purpose (including text and data mining) provided that all copyright notices and trademarks are retained.

  • Supplemental material This content has been supplied by the author(s). It has not been vetted by BMJ Publishing Group Limited (BMJ) and may not have been peer-reviewed. Any opinions or recommendations discussed are solely those of the author(s) and are not endorsed by BMJ. BMJ disclaims all liability and responsibility arising from any reliance placed on the content. Where the content includes any translated material, BMJ does not warrant the accuracy and reliability of the translations (including but not limited to local regulations, clinical guidelines, terminology, drug names and drug dosages), and is not responsible for any error and/or omissions arising from translation and adaptation or otherwise.

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