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Immersive technology in ophthalmology education: a systematic review
  1. Shakeel Lowe1,2,
  2. Kathryn Mares2,
  3. Zarnie Khadjesari2
  1. 1Norwich Medical School, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK
  2. 2School of Health Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK
  1. Correspondence to Dr Shakeel Lowe, University of East Anglia Norwich Medical School, Norwich NR4 7TJ, UK; shakeel.lowe{at}nhs.net

Abstract

Background Despite the increasing use of immersive technology (IT) in ophthalmology, the effectiveness of this approach compared to other teaching practices is unclear. This systematic review aimed to determine the value of IT to teach students ophthalmic skills and whether it can supplement or replace conventional teaching practices.

Methods A systematic search was performed of CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, ERIC and PsychINFO databases. Randomised controlled trials comparing IT interventions versus (1) no training, (2) standard training, (3) different types of IT interventions, (4) different doses of IT interventions were eligible for inclusion.

Results Seven trials involving 177 participants were included. IT offered some benefit compared to standard training as most trials demonstrated evidence of learning represented by composite performance score and performance time. Repetitive training with IT displayed similar results.

Conclusion IT appears to improve the ophthalmic skill of healthcare trainees and should be considered as a supplement to training.

  • education
  • medical
  • virtual reality
  • systematic review

Data availability statement

Data sharing not applicable as no datasets were generated and/or analysed for this study.

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Data availability statement

Data sharing not applicable as no datasets were generated and/or analysed for this study.

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Footnotes

  • Contributors SL is an academic foundation doctor at Hull University Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust. KM is a lecturer in Physiotherapy and course lead in Clinical Research at the University of East Anglia. ZK is a senior lecturer in Health Sciences at the University of East Anglia.

  • Funding The authors have not declared a specific grant for this research from any funding agency in the public, commercial or not-for-profit sectors.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; internally peer reviewed.

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